A Cane And A High Starched Collar

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A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby Suspicious Minds » Mon Jul 08, 2019 11:16 pm

According to David Neale

"A Cane And A High Starched Collar" bears a remarkable resemblance to the far older song, known variously as "Brighton Camp," "Blyth Camp," "Waxie's Dargle," but is perhaps best known as "The Girl I Left Behind Me."

The tune probably originates from Ireland, dating as far back as the 18th and perhaps even the 17th century.

The first recording of "The Girl I Left Behind Me" was probably made by the Columbia Drum, Fife and Bugle Corps in 1899 and released on a brown wax cylinder, number 12800.

https://davidneale.eu/elvis/originals/list1.html#S1721


Listen to a sample on David Neale’s site (see link above).

Another source tells us of a later recording:

‘The girl I left behind me’ (medley) recorded [by US Marine Fife and Drum Corps] on an Edison black wax cylinder circa 1904.

"Although probably an old Irish tune, "The Girl I Left Behind Me" became a popular British marching song under the title "Brighton Camp." In the years before the American revolution, it was often played when a British naval vessel set sail or an army unit left for service abroad. "The Girl I Left Behind Me" was adopted by the Americans and has become a traditional army song especially associated with the Seventh Infantry. It was also a favorite with the troops at Fort Snelling in the 19th century. Even today it is played at the United States Military Academy at West Point as part of the medley for the cadet's final formation for graduation."

https://archive.org/details/thegirl1904


Listen to a sample by tapping the link above.
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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby John » Tue Jul 09, 2019 7:18 am

Suspicious Minds wrote:According to David Neale

"A Cane And A High Starched Collar" bears a remarkable resemblance to the far older song, known variously as "Brighton Camp," "Blyth Camp," "Waxie's Dargle," but is perhaps best known as "The Girl I Left Behind Me."

The tune probably originates from Ireland, dating as far back as the 18th and perhaps even the 17th century.

The first recording of "The Girl I Left Behind Me" was probably made by the Columbia Drum, Fife and Bugle Corps in 1899 and released on a brown wax cylinder, number 12800.

https://davidneale.eu/elvis/originals/list1.html#S1721


Listen to a sample on David Neale’s site (see link above).


I can reach David's site but the link to the sound file doesn't work.

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby colonel snow » Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:25 am

Indeed the link doesn't work; you can try this link and search:

http://cylinders.library.ucsb.edu/

In my opinion the tune on the cylinders are miles away from the song we know. Perhaps some elements were used.

colonel snow

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby Mister Moon » Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:29 am

When it was released for the first time on "Elvis - A Legendary Performer - Vol. 2" (1976) the title was spelled as "Cane And A High Starched Collar".

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby colonel snow » Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:40 am

Mister Moon wrote:When it was released for the first time on "Elvis - A Legendary Performer - Vol. 2" (1976) the title was spelled as "Cane And A High Starched Collar".



With this title it's filed.


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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby colonel snow » Tue Jul 09, 2019 11:25 am

It made me curious:
On the first acetates it’s titled: A cane and a high starched collar;
On the Flaming star acetate it’s titled: Cane and high starched collar;
Registered at ASCAP: A cane and a high starched collar.


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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby Suspicious Minds » Tue Jul 09, 2019 1:08 pm

John wrote:
Suspicious Minds wrote:According to David Neale

"A Cane And A High Starched Collar" bears a remarkable resemblance to the far older song, known variously as "Brighton Camp," "Blyth Camp," "Waxie's Dargle," but is perhaps best known as "The Girl I Left Behind Me."

The tune probably originates from Ireland, dating as far back as the 18th and perhaps even the 17th century.

The first recording of "The Girl I Left Behind Me" was probably made by the Columbia Drum, Fife and Bugle Corps in 1899 and released on a brown wax cylinder, number 12800.

https://davidneale.eu/elvis/originals/list1.html#S1721


Listen to a sample on David Neale’s site (see link above).


I can reach David's site but the link to the sound file doesn't work.


When you tap the link above and scroll down to ‘A Cane and A High Starched Collar’, you’ll notice that there’s a play button in the introduction, just after the sentence ‘Originally recorded by ...’.

Indeed, the link ‘Hear the cylinder’ at the bottom doesn’t work. The play button does in the intro does. On my device, it does.
Don't take yourself too seriously ;-)

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby John » Tue Jul 09, 2019 2:11 pm

Suspicious Minds wrote:
John wrote:
Suspicious Minds wrote:According to David Neale

"A Cane And A High Starched Collar" bears a remarkable resemblance to the far older song, known variously as "Brighton Camp," "Blyth Camp," "Waxie's Dargle," but is perhaps best known as "The Girl I Left Behind Me."

The tune probably originates from Ireland, dating as far back as the 18th and perhaps even the 17th century.

The first recording of "The Girl I Left Behind Me" was probably made by the Columbia Drum, Fife and Bugle Corps in 1899 and released on a brown wax cylinder, number 12800.

https://davidneale.eu/elvis/originals/list1.html#S1721


Listen to a sample on David Neale’s site (see link above).


I can reach David's site but the link to the sound file doesn't work.


When you tap the link above and scroll down to ‘A Cane and A High Starched Collar’, you’ll notice that there’s a play button in the introduction, just after the sentence ‘Originally recorded by ...’.

Indeed, the link ‘Hear the cylinder’ at the bottom doesn’t work. The play button does in the intro does. On my device, it does.

Got it. Thank you.

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby Suspicious Minds » Tue Jul 09, 2019 3:13 pm

colonel snow wrote:Indeed the link doesn't work; you can try this link and search:

http://cylinders.library.ucsb.edu/

In my opinion the tune on the cylinders are miles away from the song we know. Perhaps some elements were used.

colonel snow


I wonder where Neale gets his info from. As you noticed too, maybe there’s just an ‘accidental’, limited resemblance. And no more than that.

IF the tune was a source of inspiration for Tepper and Bennett, I’d like to know where Neale got this info from. An interview given by the songwriters?

But it seems Neale doesn’t go that far; he states there’s ‘a resemblance’, nothing more.
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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby Mister Moon » Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:27 pm

colonel snow wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:When it was released for the first time on "Elvis - A Legendary Performer - Vol. 2" (1976) the title was spelled as "Cane And A High Starched Collar".



With this title it's filed.


That's probably where they got it from.

And the acetate labels you posted above show another variation - "starch" instead or "starched".

What is a "high starch(ed) collar" anyway ? :)

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby John » Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:32 pm

Mister Moon wrote:
colonel snow wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:When it was released for the first time on "Elvis - A Legendary Performer - Vol. 2" (1976) the title was spelled as "Cane And A High Starched Collar".



With this title it's filed.


That's probably where they got it from.

And the acetate labels you posted above show another variation - "starch" instead or "starched".

What is a "high starch(ed) collar" anyway ? :)

It’s a high collar that’s starched.

People used to starch collars on shirts so that they kept a nice shape. It’s a long gone habit.

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby Mister Moon » Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:37 pm

John wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:
colonel snow wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:When it was released for the first time on "Elvis - A Legendary Performer - Vol. 2" (1976) the title was spelled as "Cane And A High Starched Collar".



With this title it's filed.


That's probably where they got it from.

And the acetate labels you posted above show another variation - "starch" instead or "starched".

What is a "high starch(ed) collar" anyway ? :)

It’s a high collar that’s starched.

People used to starch collars on shirts so that they kept a nice shape. It’s a long gone habit.


Thanks.

I see now what "starch" means. It was also used for skirts in the 50s.

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby John » Fri Jul 12, 2019 9:23 am

Mister Moon wrote:
John wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:
colonel snow wrote:
Mister Moon wrote:When it was released for the first time on "Elvis - A Legendary Performer - Vol. 2" (1976) the title was spelled as "Cane And A High Starched Collar".



With this title it's filed.


That's probably where they got it from.

And the acetate labels you posted above show another variation - "starch" instead or "starched".

What is a "high starch(ed) collar" anyway ? :)

It’s a high collar that’s starched.

People used to starch collars on shirts so that they kept a nice shape. It’s a long gone habit.


Thanks.

I see now what "starch" means. It was also used for skirts in the 50s.

Yes, basically it's a stiffener. (no rude jokes about what Colin uses it for please).

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby Colin B » Fri Jul 12, 2019 10:11 am

John wrote:Yes, basically it's a stiffener. (no rude jokes about what Colin uses it for please).


Do you want a photo of what I use ?
Colin B

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Re: A Cane And A High Starched Collar

Postby John » Fri Jul 12, 2019 10:37 am

Colin B wrote:
John wrote:Yes, basically it's a stiffener. (no rude jokes about what Colin uses it for please).


Do you want a photo of what I use ?

URR....UMMM, NO!


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